Connect with us

Police Release Names of 10 KyoAni Arson Victims

"Ema" prayer plaques bearing messages to the victims of the Kyoto Animation arson attack, left at Washinomiya Shrine in Kuki, Saitama Prefecture. [Photo: The Japan Times, 2019]
"Ema" prayer plaques bearing messages to the victims of the Kyoto Animation arson attack, left at Washinomiya Shrine in Kuki, Saitama Prefecture. [Photo: The Japan Times, 2019]

Passings

Asia

Police Release Names of 10 KyoAni Arson Victims

Kyoto Prefectural Police Headquarters has made public the names of 10 of the 35 victims who were killed in the arson attack on Kyoto Animation studio on July 18. All of the deceased have been identified, but names are being withheld pending consent of the victims’ families. The announcement was made by chief investigator Ryoji Nishiyama, who told reporters Friday that the families are in deep shock, and that the studio has been opposed to releasing the victims’ names.

The named victims include director Yasuhiro Takemoto, age 47, who helmed many of KyoAni’s shows including its hit slice-of-life anime Lucky Star; Yuka Kasama, 22, a new hire at the studio; veteran animator and artistic mentor Yoshiji Kigami, 61; key animator Ami Kuriki (Liz and the Blue Bird), 30; animation director/character designer Futoshi Nishiya (Free!), 37; Yuki Omura, 23, new hire; finishing animator Sachie Tsuda (Free!), 41; key animator Junichi Uda (Hyouka), 34; production manager Keisuke Yokota, 34; and art director Mikiko Watanabe (Beyond the Boundary), 35.

Outside the police conference, the family of Naomi Ishida disclosed her death.

Over the weekend, fans began setting up and visiting memorials at “holy sites” — real-world locations featured in KyoAni’s works, such as the area of Kishihara (reflected in Beyond the Boundary), Kyoto’s Demachimasugata shopping street (Tamako Market) and Washinomiya Shrine in Kuki (Lucky Star).

Joining the outpouring of financial support from fans and colleagues around the world, rock band X Japan frontman Yoshiki has donated 10 million yen (about $94,000 USD) to the dedicated victims and survivors support fund, through his own Yoshiki Foundation America charity branch. Yoshiki, who travels to many anim/Japanese pop culture conventions around the world with X Japan, posted to Twitter:

“I am in the United States and I learned about the Kyoto Animation fire on the local news. My heart aches. Japanese anime, and each one of those creators, is a treasure of the world. I hope they recover as soon as possible. I’m always doing tours around the world. No matter where I go, animation fans come to my concerts and support my global activities. I’m always grateful to them. And I always want to contribute to the development of Japan’s anime culture, which I consider one of the world’s treasures. I truly share the pain of those who lost their families. I really hope this will assist the bereaved, and also hope that the circle of support around them will expand.”

Yoshiki composed several theme songs for hit anime, including “Forever Love” for X, “Scarlet Love Song” for Tezuka Osamu’s Buddha: The Great Departure, “Hero” for Saint Selva: Legend of Sanctuary and “Red Swan” for Attack on Titan.

Fans in North America can contribute to the Help KyoAni Heal GoFundMe campaign organized by Sentai Filmworks. The campaign has raised $2.3 million in just over two weeks.

[Sources: NHK, Japan Times, Loudwire]

Comments

More in Passings

Newsletter


Recent Posts

Featured Trailers

Could not generate embed. Please try it again.

To Top
Advertisement