Paramount to Stop Beaming Enterprise

Paramount Network Television will bid farewell to Star Trek: Enterprise, the latest incarnation of Gene Roddenberry’s brainy sci-fi franchise. After floundering on UPN for four seasons, the Emmy-winning series will come to a close on Friday May 13.

Created and exec produced by Rick Berman and Brannon Braga, Enterprise stars Scott Bakula as Captain John Archer, commander of the first warp five starship to explore the galaxy in the 22nd Century. While spin-offs like Voyager and Deep Space 9 managed to tap into Trek’s loyal fanbase, Enterprise has pulled disappointing numbers since debuting on UPN in September of 2001. To make things worse, the show was moved to Friday nights opposite SCI FI Channel’s far more popular Stargate SG-1.

“Star Trek has been an important part of UPN’s history, and Enterprise has carried on the tradition of its predecessors with great distinction,” says Dawn Ostroff, president of entertainment at UPN. Ostroff thanks Berman, Braga and the cast for their work on the series and notes, "We look forward to working with them, and our partners at Paramount Network Television, on a send-off that salutes its contributions to The Network and satisfies its loyal viewers.”

In a last-stitch effort, fans of the show launched www.SaveEnterprise.com and urged fellow Trekies to write protest letters to CBS co-president Leslie Moonves. Though they’ll have to give up the ship, devotees can take solace in the fact that the series lasted longer than the original Star Trek, which was cancelled due to low ratings after its third season.

Despite the cancellation, Enterprise won’t disappear from the tube altogether. In January, Paramount Domestic Television sold the show’s reruns into off-network syndication in more than 90% of the country, including 49 of the 50 top markets, for debut in Fall 2005. Then there’s always hope of some sort of reunion, like the four-hour miniseries SCI FI commissioned after fans protested last year’s cancellation of Farscape.

Enterprise received four Emmys during its run, including the 2004 award for visual effects in a television series.